Skip to main content

The University of La Verne's Institutional Heritage

Information and resources for "A Grant-Supported Project An Artful Reframing: ULV’s Heritage, Identity, and Our Current Context."

Project Overview

You are invited to be part of a University-wide project, An Artful Reframing: ULV’s Heritage, Identity, and Current Context.  Supported by a grant received from the Council of Independent Colleges, the University of La Verne invites proposals for written or multimedia artifacts from university faculty and staff representing all disciplinary perspectives for research to be included in a compendium on the heritage, history, and current identity of the University of La Verne. The goals of this project, An Artful Reframing, are as follows:

  1. To create an updated, reframed history that tells our story with a more inclusive voice;
  2. To reckon honestly with our history and heritage as a predominantly white institution that has evolved into a minority-serving institution;
  3. To develop an institutional narrative of the significance and relevance of our Brethren heritage for our present and future vision, mission and purpose;
  4. To describe a clear understanding of our Brethren moral roots that can be a resource and source of empowerment for our present and future;
  5. To create artifacts (essays and multimedia contributions) that represent and tell the story of a reframed institutional narrative in light of who we are today and who we serve and empower.

Call for Proposals

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
A Grant-Supported Project

An Artful Reframing: ULV’s Heritage, Identity, and Current Context

The University of La Verne invites proposals for written or multimedia artifacts from university faculty and staff representing all disciplinary perspectives for research to be included in a compendium on the heritage, history, and current identity of the University of La Verne. The goals of this project, An Artful Reframing, are as follows:

  1. To create an updated, reframed history that tells our story with a more inclusive voice;
  2. To develop an institutional narrative of the significance and relevance of our Brethren heritage for our present and future vision, mission and purpose;
  3. To reckon honestly with our history and heritage as a predominantly white institution that has evolved into a minority-serving institution;
  4. To describe a clear understanding of our Brethren moral roots that can be a resource and source of empowerment for our present and future;
  5. To create artifacts (essays and multimedia contributions) that represent and tell the story of a reframed institutional narrative in light of who we are today and who we serve and empower.

In conjunction with twelve focus group discussions about University identity and heritage, this grant-funded project will offer support for the development and completion of accepted proposals in the amount of $500/semester for up to three semesters, beginning this semester (Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022).  Artifacts are to be completed by May 2022.  Interested applicants are invited to submit a 250-word proposal for a project by April 19 through email to Zandra Wagoner, University Chaplain and grant PI. Applicants are encouraged to address one or more of the following questions:

  • How has our Brethren heritage informed the institution’s vision?
  • What is the significance of this unique history and heritage for us today? How might it inform the institution’s current vision? 
  • When we reference this heritage in public spaces, what do we gain?  What is meant by this reference to our founders? How might we draw on this connection to reframe our commitments in ways that balance our history, identity, and heritage that situate them within their current context and call them into the future?
  • What does this heritage have to say to this moment?
  • What are the limitations of this heritage? 
  • How have white supremacy and white-body supremacy shaped the institution? How have patriarchy and gender role conformity shaped the institution?
  • Who are we now?  What are the histories of our institution that have not been told?  What communities have been marginalized in our institutional history?
  • How does the history that preceded our founding inform our institutional identity?
  • How might an expanded/updated/more inclusive history shift and reframe our institutional vision, purpose, meaning, and values?


Those interested in submitting a proposal are invited and encouraged to consult the following University Archive’s resource page - collected specifically for this project – of existing artifacts about ULV’s heritage and identity:
https://laverne.libguides.com/c.php?g=1124183&p=8199805

Accepted proposals will be peer-reviewed for inclusion in a published volume.

The leadership team for this grant project include: Allyson Brantley, Alexandra Burrel, Al Clark, Benjamin Jenkins, Dion Johnson, Jason Neidleman, Raul Perez, Juan Regalado, Zandra Wagoner (project lead).